David Malik.UK

 

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Ibeji Twin Female Figure
Yoruba, Nigeria
25cm
wood, pigment, encrusted patina, offering remains, beads

Provenance: Private Collection, Paris, France
Auction House, Paris, France
Ken Garwood, Hastings, UK
Private Collection, Naples, FL, USA

 

 

 

DavidMalik-1

 

Salampasu Idangani Society ‘Mufuampo’ Mask
D.R.C.
35.5 cm
woven fibre, pigment, raffia, conical headdress in four parts
on custom metal stand

Provenance: Collection of Morton and Rebecca Lipkin, Arizona, USA

 

Unlike other tribes of the savannah, the Salampasu’s use of masks was unique. Through mask ownership, personal status, property gains and individual reputations flourished. Young Salampasu men were not apprentice farmers or hunters, but apprentice warriors.
This particular example of an old Mufuampo (raffia) mask is from the Idangani society. The Idangani restricted membership to certain families, then made costly to obtain. Unlike other Salampasu possessions, the right to purchase this mask was passed down from father to son, rather than mothers brother to son. The character appeared at various occasions such as birth – puberty – marriage and death, as well as at Matamba – a fierce warrior dance.
It most likely portrays a female character with five horns representing an old hairstyle once popular among Salampasu women. Horns were made of split palm reed and woven fibre – then attached

 

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Ibeji Twin Male Figure – Ogbomosho Oyo
Yoruba, Nigeria
24cm
wood, pigment, encrusted patina, offering remains, metal, beads

Provenance: Private Collection, Paris, France
Auction House, Paris, France
Ken Garwood, Hastings, UK
Private Collection, Naples, FL, USA

 

wood, pigment, encrusted patina, offering remains, metal, beads

 

 

 

DavidMalik-more shells

 

 

Goup Of Eight Ovambo (Omakipa) Ornaments
Namibia, Angola
5 cm. to 8.5 cm. long
Provenance: Private collection Edinburgh, Scotland, UK
Private collection, London, UK

Published: Lempertz Brussels, 2015

Ekipa, of circular, oval and rectangular form, one of shell, the others of ivory and bone, incised and blackened geometric ornament, fine creamy to golden patinas with traces of red tukula powder.

The ekipa is a prestigious ornament of the Ovambo people from Namibia and southern Angola.The material used for the Omakipa is elephant or hippo ivory, bone, occasionally wood and the fruit of the Makalane Palm. The Omakipa were crafted by the men of the society. The ivory was cut into chunks, buried in the sand, which was drenched with urine of domestic animals, to soften the ivory and give it a golden brownish colour. For carving, the men used a simple knife (omikonda). The borders were engraved with different geometrical patterns. Then the Ekipa was polished with sandstone and rubbed with an aloe extract and/or dolf-wood [Kiaat – Pterocarpus angolensis] powder (olukulu) to enhance the carved lines. The underside of the Ekipa is mostly smooth and flat or slightly curved with two or four holes so that it could be attached to leather belts. Although the underside of the Ekipa’s are normally very plain, there are odd ones that have a number of engravings. Mostly woman wore Ekipa’s attached to a leather belt or thong with the number of Omakipa they possessed being an indication of the wealth of their husbands. The Omakipa were passed on from mother to daughter. They were also worn as ornaments around the neck or upper arm.

 

 

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